winona laduke

The last tar sands pipeline by Winona LaDuke

The last tar sands pipeline by Winona LaDuke

In early June, I traveled to Enbridge’s Shareholder meeting in Calgary, in Alberta Canada. Outside, laid off oil workers screamed, “Build that Pipe” over a bullhorn, and asked people to honk if they supported Canadian oil. Those tar sands workers will likely never have jobs in the industry again – economists, and even the oil fairy government of Alberta, are sobering up to the Boom Bust economy of energy projects. It’s the bust and there is no boom in sight. That’s the problem. It’s really a race to the bottom and to the end ­– that is to be the last tar sands pipeline. For the past four years Canada has been trying to run tar sands pipelines through the US, to the Coast, to anywhere, and it has not gone well. And it’s not going to, and here are the reasons why ...

Navajo Technical University confers first honorary doctoral degree to John Pinto

Navajo Technical University confers first honorary doctoral degree to John Pinto

CROWNPOINT — When recapping his six year journey to earn a bachelor's degree at Navajo Technical University, Darrick Lee called the experience a "privilege."

Graduates heard an inspiring speech by Winona LaDuke, an internationally renowned activist for the environment and for social justice. 

LaDuke is Anishinaabe and executive director of Honor the Earth, an organization she co-founded with Amy Ray and Emily Salier of the music group, Indigo Girls.

In her remarks, she reflected on the energy transition the Navajo Nation faces and how the graduates will take the lead in developing that change, including investment in solar and wind projects.

"No time like the present to rebuild your energy economy," she said.

She said now is the time to end the injustice done by energy developers to Native peoples, including using the land to produce energy for urban populations while nearby households remain without electricity.

"Your nation will be a leader in this. I see this and know this. We are all counting on you to do the right thing," LaDuke said.

Noel Lyn Smith covers the Navajo Nation for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4636 or by email at nsmith@daily-times.com.

Hole in the Day, or Bug o ne giizhig Famed Ojibwe chief leaves checkered legacy 150 years after assassination

Hole in the Day, or Bug o ne giizhig Famed Ojibwe chief leaves checkered legacy 150 years after assassination

Famed Ojibwe chief leaves checkered legacy 150 years after assassination

Hole in the Day was one of the negotiators of the l867 treaty which created the White Earth Reservation, and most of his descendants came to live on this reservation. He was never allowed to live out his life in peace on White Earth, but was assassinated on the Gull River, near Crow Wing, in l868.

The Last Minnesota Indian Conflict - Interesting history connected to Round Lake

The Last Minnesota Indian Conflict - Interesting history connected to Round Lake

The Last Minnesota Indian Conflict: Through the hard work of Skip-in-the-Day and other Ojibwe Leaders and warriors, a Pine Point merchant, and other honest people this fraud was revealed.  The Band received the correct payment and corrections in the dead and down pine policy were made.   This ended the conflict at Round Lake, but not the conflicts coming at the White Earth Band of Ojibwe.  For the next big manipulation came with trying to “Open up the Reservation.”